Empathic Design Continued – Blog 8

This week we learned about empathic design in an up front way. I learned that putting yourself in another’ shoes in order to design is essentially empathic design. There is a purpose and a goal. It is aesthetically pleasing; it has tenacity and is a movement on its own. As designers we must think of how our designs are perceived both as a design but as a usable, livable being in it. There is a meaning behind our designs, and our future depends on these meanings that grow with us through age, technology and inspiration.

The LOLA shows from this week also included a lot of impact on empathic design through different shows. Boston children’s hospital was a major element that showed how effective and imaginative empathic design could become and grow. We also learned that design is concerned through everyone and everywhere. Shows covered empathic design through transgender clothing, those struggling with dementia and Alzheimer’s, arthritis, breast cancer and even an architect who had lost his vision, but is still continuing his work completely blind. It was absolutely incredible to see that happening.

Sustainability comes into play through all of these designs because (it is the subject of this class). Empathic design can be both very sustainable and very unsustainable.

The most difficult part of this section is changing our perspectives of design. It is fascinating how designing empathetically can change so many dimensions of daily life. Changing our ideas to help or see through someone else’s needs or handicaps is such a different way to think of while designing. In studio I can definitely think of how I could design empathically through even the smallest of floor plans and construction documents.

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