Blog 8- Lola Show & Human Needs

This week’s Lola Show was interesting as the topic was focused around ways to better a hospital (and other healthcare facilities) by incorporating nature. One girl discussed how aquariums, or forms of water should be used more in waiting rooms as water reduces stress and watching fish swim around can be distracting for family members. I love this idea because there is nothing worse than having to sit in a waiting room for an extended amount of time when your mind is nervous. Forcing yourself to read crummy magazines is a lot harder than zoning in on a fish tank. Another girl discussed the overall need of views or pieces of nature in hospital or healthcare settings. It has been proven that indoor healing gardens have benefited patients, and honestly being able to see anything other than one’s hospital/dentist/physical therapy room. Another girl then discussed the benefits of using LED lights to create a natural light that reduces anxiety.

This week we looked at sustainable design at its first most basic level. How can we solve human needs? By understanding the needs of who were designing for, it makes it easier to find and end solution. I liked the activity we did in class on Thursday relating those needs to “having, being, or doing.” My team came up with an idea for a “paying it forward” hotel. Not only will the person who is renting the room be having their needs met, but they can also feel a sense of being, by paying for the stay for someone else who may be in need. When it comes to design, I think it’s always important to take that step back, look at the bottom line or the basic goal, and then work up from there. Today, I believe that’s where the fashion industry lost the mark. Stores that continue to produce goods unethically don’t care about human needs anymore. Making the most profit in the least amount of time is really the only thing these corporations care about, so using cheap labor and harming the planet is what they will continue to do.

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